Today we are sharing another reflection by Sisters of Bon Secours novice, Sr. Ji Choi. Beginning this Friday, Sr. Ji will be hosting a weekly time for Lectio Divina or Bible Mediation, prior to Mass. If you’re not familiar with Lectio Divina, read below to learn more. Sr. Ji will guide this free group mini-retreat and we hope to see you at the Center for a session soon!

What is Lectio Divina?catholic, lectio divina

It must be one of the most historic forms of prayer. It was exercised by Monks when preparing for Liturgy since around the 3rd Century. Today, it is the most commonly used way of meditating with scripture which is also recommended by the Church.

Lectio Divina in Latin means Divine reading. In 2005, Pope Benedict XVI reaffirmed the importance of Lectio Divina on the 40th anniversary of “Dei Verbum”:

“I would like in particular to recall and recommend the ancient tradition of Lectio Divina: the diligent reading of Sacred Scripture accompanied by prayer brings about that intimate dialogue in which the person reading hears God, who is speaking, and in praying, responds to Him with trusting openness of heart [cf. Dei verbum, n. 25]. If it is effectively promoted, this practice will bring to the Church – I am convinced of it – a new spiritual springtime.”

Lectio Divina consists of the following four steps.

Lectio (read) – read a part of scriptures.

Meditatio (meditate) – Take in the scripture slowly and think deeply or ponder with God about its textures and contents without one’s own thoughts.

Oratio (pray) – Listen to what the heart naturally wants to say to God and hear something in response. It is a time to have conversation with God.

Contemplatio (contemplate) – Just spend that last moment in silence, completely content, taking it all in, savoring it, enjoying it, just like “being” there with the people that you love, with the God that you love. It is about resting in God’s arms without any thought.

To learn more about this Friday’s Bible Mediation session, please click here.